Selection from ‘The McCarthy Files’ artist’s book

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The McCarthy Files Daniel D. Teoli Jr Archival Collection lr

Selection from The McCarthy Files artist’s book by Daniel D. Teoli Jr. / Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection

An upset-minded Joe McCarthy won a congressional seat in 1946, stressing his world War II record. He was a captain in a Marine driven dive-bombing squadron, serving in the South Pacific.

Press photo filed 11.25.1946 Milwaukee Journal

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De Wallen Graffiti 2014 Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

 

Film vs. Digital…image quality.

Article Dedication

In Honor of

Max Yavno & Horst

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If we are talking negative film, then the big difference between film and digital is with sharpness. Digital is much sharper than negative film if all things are equal. 35mm negative film is equal to about 3 or 4 mp with a point and shoot camera. (See link for photos at end of post.) Negative film is pretty low res imaging media compared to our state of the art and even not so state of the art digital imaging.

Digital can have a more plastic, artificial look. Film can have a more grainy, softer look.  Film can have cleaner blacks in the shadows. Digital tries to make sense of shadows sometime with noise. Just depends on the light. This is my general conclusion.

Here is an example…

the-who-jim-marshall-dye-transfer-print

A film era dye transfer print by Jim Marshall

little-dicky-lucky-chops-2016-daniel-d-teoli-jr-m

A digital photo by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

It was shot wide open, in poor light @ f1.4. It would have been sharper if closed down a stop or two.

More comparisons of film versus digital…

http://www.photographycompared.tumblr.com/

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De Wallen Graffiti 2014 Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

Selection from ‘Blow Man Blow’ artist’s book by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

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Selection from 'Blow Man Blow' Daniel d. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection lr

Selection from ‘Blow Man Blow’ artist’s book by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

A collection of early erotic photography from the 1890’s to 1920’s from the Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection

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De Wallen Graffiti 2014 Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

The End of an Era…Ringling Brothers and Barnum Circus

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Article Dedication

in Honor of

 Sylvie Pénichon & Nicéphore Niépce

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After 146 years Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey has closed. One of their most recognized acts was their elephants.  Here is a post from the archives in honor of the elephants service through the years in entertaining us.

Circus Elephant 2013 Daniel D. Teoli Jr V23

Shrine Circus elephant – Ohio Valley

Photo by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

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Introduction

As our world change and things become history it is very important for photogs to document what once was for future generations.

Sculpted Roof copyright 2012 Danuiel D. Teoli Jr. mr

When I was growing up in L.A., textured roofs were fairly common near the Miracle Mile. One day when I was visiting I noticed they were all gone except for a single example that I could find. That roof was leaking and scheduled for replacement as well.

DSC03307 mr

Another relic from L.A. was the concrete incinerator. Most houses had them in the back yard. They were very popular for burning trash. In the 1950’s they were outlawed

Not that long ago when there were high diving horses on New Jersey’s Steel Pier. Many people don’t know this. Even after decades of operation there are only a few photos of the act to be found. So many things going extinct for the social documentary photog to archive.

1929 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (5) mr 564789 mr 882390 mr

The circus revived the diving horse act for a short time, but has discontinued it.

1961 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (8) mr

1961- Shirley Peterson with ‘Gimael’ diving into a 38,000 gallon tank at the Hamid-Morton Circus. A note on the back of the print says ‘The negative was lost!”

If PETA has its way all animals used for enjoyment and forced labor would be stopped.

http://www.peta.org

1958 (est) - Mutton Buster

No more rodeo.

1960 (est) - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (1) mr

No more hunting.

1954 (est) - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (3) mr

All the zoos would be emptied.

1925 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

Equestrian games and horse racing stopped.

1925

- Selection from Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (6) mr

Bullfighting would be extinct.

1936 – Mexican bullfighter in Madrid substituting for a Spanish matador, who are on strike.

Is all this good or bad?

I don’t take sides…I just document my world.

In any case, the circus has a long history of using animal acts to entertain people and the documentation of that history is the purpose of this post.

1840 - Palmyre Annato mr

1840 – Palmyre Annato

1886 - Chiarini Chikanobu mr

1886 – Chiarini Chikanobu

Even if no animals are used there is pain, suffering and death in the circus….

- Selection from Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (3) mr

1962 – Mario Wallenda, who was crippled in a fall, watches his family perform.

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Here are some vintage press photos and snapshots from the Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection to memorialize the end of an era…the circus elephant.

1921 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1921 – Minnie, a dying zoo elephant.  In the photos that follow you will see a lot of hand retouching. Before Photoshop, it was not uncommon to add some art handwork to the press photo if things needed improving. Here they have drawn in some background.

1922 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1922 – Trying to right a sick ‘Hattie.’ – Central Park N.Y.C.

1922 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1922 – Preparing a taxidermy specimen. The largest female elephant ever killed. Roosevelt Memorial Museum of Natural History N.Y.C.

1923 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1923 – Langer Circus School,  England.

1926 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1926 – Recovering a five ton escaped circus elephant that terrorized Kansas for 4 days.

Republican Celebration 1929 Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection

1929 – Republicans christening their mascot.

1934 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1934 – An elephant looking for snacks at the London Zoo.

1934 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1934 – Osceola Seminole Indians – Florida

1936 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1936 – Children mesmerized by the elephant circus parade.

1936 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1936 – Loyola Lions visit the Los Angeles Zoological Park.

1937 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1937 – Trainer Jean Allen and aerialist Bertha Denham leave the Chicago train station and arrive at the Cole Brothers Circus via pachyderm.

1938 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1938 – Madison Square Garden, a Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus elephant plays dead in a rehearsal.

1939 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1939 – Quebec, a 8 foot long, 6 foot high snow elephant made by 2 boys.

1939 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1939 – Photo by James Thomas

1939 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (4) mr

1939 – N.Y.C. Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey unloading a train full of animal acts at the Mott Haven Yards for a show at the Garden.

1940 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1940 – With a heat wave in Chicago nearing 100 degrees, circus elephant ‘Nancy’ cools off.

1940 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (3) mr

1940 – Americans at Work radio show. Jack Knell interviewer is siting atop ‘Ruth’ a Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus elephant at Madison Square Garden, N.Y.C. with Eric McGill, Producer / Director listening.

1940 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1940 – Cleveland Zoo recovers escaped elephant. – Ohio

Photo by James Mell

During the WWII years of 1941-1945 the historical record is slim for photos of circus elephants. All domestic efforts were concentrated on the war.

Here is a before and after comparison to show you the amount of post processing that was used for some of the photos. The press photos varied from very good to poor in image quality.

1946 NO PP mr

1946 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr (2)

1946 – Cleveland, OH – Back of photo marked ‘Reversed print.’

Photo by Glenn Zahn

- Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1947 – Patricia Cooney and Dennis Hughes at the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey show at Madison Square Garden N.Y.C.

1947 - Selection from Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (4) mr

1947- Edward Raymond, clown for the Shriners Circus visiting kids at the Shrine Hospital. – Chicago.

1950 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1950 – The ‘circus comes to town’ parade. – N.Y.C.

1951 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (1) mr

1951 – Pre-show practice. – Spokane, WA

1951 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1951- Four year old Nanette Sharkey of Baltimore, MD greets ‘Betty’ at the Paris Vincennes Zoo.

1951 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1951 – Elephants keeping in shape while wintering in Ft. Myers, FL. at Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey compound.

1952 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1952 – Gift to the Franklin Park Zoo. – Boston, MA

- Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (1) mr

1952 (est) – Rosemary Adair of the Clyde Beatty – Cole Brothers Circus. – Sarasota, FL

1952 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (3) mr

1952 – Clyde Beatty Circus. – Spokane, WA.

1952 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1952 – ‘Teola’ , Nino Marcel and Ed McConnell in elevator at CBS Television City, Los Angeles, CA for show Smilin Ed’s Gang.

1953 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1953 – Trainer Floyd Smith and assistant Joe Stephens work on ‘Honey’ the dancing elephant who has irritated feet from too much contact with concrete. – St. Louis, MO.

1953 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (3) mr

1953 – Shrine Circus elephant scoops up a trunk of snow in Chicago.

1953 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (4) mr

1953 – Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus. – Spokane, WA.

1953 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1953 – San Diego Zoo new arrival ‘Peaches’, an African elephant from Portuguese East Africa.

Photo by Richard Van Nostrand

1954 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1954 – London Zoo

1954 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1954 – ‘Babe’ 4 ton circus elephant. – St. Paul, MN.

1955 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1955 – Off US-31 in Holland, MI, ‘Roxie’ a 5 ton circus elephant lays on her side with a bad case of colic. Susan Bible tries to comfort her after the vet pumped thousands of units of penicillin and glucose into the elephant.

1956 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (1) mr

1956 – Street cleaner Tom Perraro ponders the cleanup of a circus elephant that died during a heat wave in N.Y.C.

1956 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (4) mr

1956 – The Big Top!

1956 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1956 – Lorraine Parker (left) and Annette Sinclair meet ‘Dumbo’ at the London Zoo.

1957 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1957 – Pre-show practice. – Cleveland, OH.

Photo by Frank Alexsandrowicz

1957 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1957 – A tiny Dik-Dik stands between a massive elephant at Rowland Ward’s taxidermy shop in London. Both are taxidermy mounts.

1959 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (4) mr

1959 – Althoff Circus – Nuremberg, Germany.

1959 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1959 – Secretary of State Robert Zimmerman (Rep)  rides ‘Blanche’ at the Circus Museum in Baraboo, WI.

1960 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1960 – El Paso Zoo, Texas.

1960 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (3) mr

1960

1961 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (4) mr

1961 – ‘Bimbo’ the worlds only waterskiing elephant. – San Diego, CA

1961 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (5) mr

1961 – London Zoo

1961 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (6) mr

1961-Togni Circus, Rome

1961 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (7) mr

1961 – A gift from the children of India arrives at a port in Norfolk, VA. A crane is used to hoist it off the ship where it will be loaded onto a truck to be delivered to a zoo in Washington, D.C.

1961 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1961 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection rev mr

1961- Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus elephants taking a water break after being unloaded off the train for the show at the Coliseum in Spokane, WA

1962 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1962 – 18 year old Gloria Paul taking a ride on ‘Candy’ at the Zoo in Chessington, England.

1963 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1963 – Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus arrive in Spokane, WA parading the animal troupe en route to the Coliseum traveling on West Riverside, north on Division and west on Boone.

1967 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (48) mr

1967 – Zoo in Europe.

Photo by B. Miedza

1967 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr1967

1970 (est)- Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (7) mr

1970 (est)

1971 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1971 – Wild African Elephant

1972 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1971 – Description on verso: Ethpawura – the wall of elephants whcih runs around the Ruwanveliseya Dagaba, Anuradhapura, Ceylon / Alternate description: Ruwanwelisaya in the sacred city of Anuradhapura in Sri Lanka

1971 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (3) mr

1971 – Spokane, WA

1971 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (5) mr

1971 – Reading, Berkshire, England – ‘Birma’ with four year old Shane Smart, son of Billy Wilson Smart of the famous circus family.

1973 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1973 – Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus elephants taking a food break after being unloaded off the train.

- Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (5) mr

1973 (est)

1974 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (3) mr

1974 – Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey miniature circus created by Ernie and Virginia Palmquest.

1974 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1974 – Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus with William ‘Buckles’ Woodcock.

1975 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1975 – London Zoo

1975 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1975 – Zippity Zoo night – Cleveland, OH

1975 (est) - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1975 (est) – Circus Vargas

1980 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1980 – ‘The Elephant’ in the ‘Stone Forest’- Kunming, China

1980 (est) - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1980 (est)

1981 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1981 – Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus elephant arriving by train. –  Cleveland, OH.

Photo by David I. Andersen

1981- Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1981

1984 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (4) mr

1984 – Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus. – St. Petersburg, FL

1984 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1984 – ‘Lucy’ the Elephant – Margate, NJ

1984 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1984

1984 (est) - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1984 (est) – Circus Vargas

1986 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (2) mr

1986 – The Greatest Show on Earth! Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus – Cleveland, OH

1986 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1986 – Ben Barkin

1989 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (5) mr1989 – Shrine Circus – First-graders from Cahill Elementary in Edina. – Minneapolis, MN

1990 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1990 – Joel Starr at the Clark County Fair

1991 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr

1991 – Shrine Circus – Spokane Interstate Fairgrounds, WA

1992 - Selection from The End of an Era - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection mr1992 – Shriners sponsored Jordan International Circus – Troy Metzler cooling down ‘Malkia’a 14 year old African elephant.

Photo by Lisa D. Finoer

2012 - Selection from The End of an Era mr (2)

2012 – Shriners Circus – Ohio Valley

Photo by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

2013 - Selection from The End of an Era mr (1)

2013 – Shriners Circus – Ohio Valley

Photo by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

2013 - Selection from The End of an Era mr (3)

2013 – Pittsburgh Zoo

Photo by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

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Photographs used herewith were taken in part from the following artists’ books by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

The End of an Era

In Their Day

Frosty

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Girls of the Beat Generation - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection

Girls of the Beat Generation

A forthcoming 6 volume artists’ book series by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

A complete list of artists’ books by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

https://danielteolijr.wordpress.com/2016/03/07/artists-books-by-daniel-d-teoli-jr-2/

De Wallen Graffiti 2014 Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

 

 

Just because it is marked archival…it does not mean it IS archival!

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Article Dedication

In Honor of

Arthur Tress & Clarence John Laughlin

and in special Memory of

Bob Pace

Bob Pace

Dye Transfer Printer

and

Founding Father of Dye Stability Testing

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Selection from Dye Stability Testing of Color Imaging Media – Edition II artist’s book by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

PrintFile archival after 20 years D.D. Teoli Jr.

PrintFile’s archival preservers mid 1990’s vintage (left) ~ new 2016 PrintFile’s archival preservers (right).  After 2 decades of normal household (dark) storage PrintFile’s archival preservers turned yellow. Test was conducted in a non smoking home.

PrintFile archival yellowing D.D. Teoli Jr.m

The pages show the yellowing best when placed in a small pile. Single pages do not show the change as dramatically and may go unnoticed by the archivist.

Single 2016 PrintFile’s archival preserver page on left – Single 1990’s PrintFile’s archival preserver page on right

Sample fade tests from Edition I of Dye Stability Testing of Color Imaging Media :

http://fadetesting.tumblr.com/

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Girls of the Beat Generation Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection

Selection from landmark 6 volume artist’s book series Girls of the Beat Generation by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

https://danielteolijr.wordpress.com/2016/04/21/girls-of-the-beat-generation-artists-book/

A complete listing of artist’s book by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

https://danielteolijr.wordpress.com/2016/03/07/artists-books-by-daniel-d-teoli-jr-2/

De Wallen Graffiti 2014 Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

How to stop being discouraged from lack of feedback?

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Article Dedication

In Honor of

George Tice & Horace

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Today we are so incredibly fortunate to be able to share our work with the entire world with a press of a button, while it’s a blessing, its a curse.

We are so use to people these days providing some sort of feedback on your work and we enjoy getting that feedback, it makes us feel good.

What happens when we don’t get feedback? We feel discouraged and makes you think that you are not good enough.

There are times when I get a lot of feedback on my images in forms such as favorites, likes, comments (negative or positive) and that really encourages me to keep going but there are occasions when I get very little if not no feedback on my work and it makes me think, well maybe this photo just sucks and I start to feel discouraged and contemplate deleting the photo.

Social media is a very odd thing. You see all these photographers on Facebook, Flickr, Instagram, etc and they have thousands and thousands of followers and get an alarming amount of feedback but yet their photos are mostly mediocre and processed using a one click VSCO filter, every single photo looks and feels exactly the same.

Is that what photography is? Just to get views and popular on the internet? I’m seeing this more and more everyday. I know many photographers who’s work is outstanding, heck a few I know have photos on display in popular art museums and yet, they get next to no feedback when they share their work on social media. Why is that?

I’m unfortunately falling down this trap, I’m starting to post my photos certain times of the day using certain tags, processing them a certain way to get the maximum popularity just so I get that little tiny bit of feedback that makes me feel good but even then, its not a guarantee your going to receive that feedback your looking for. When you do all this work and get little or no feedback, it can really upset you and bring you down.

What can we do keep ourselves encouraged when we don’t get feedback on our work? How do you keep yourself encouraged?

One might say to not post your work on the internet, while I understand that, I certainly don’t want to end up like Vivian Maier! I like to share my work with the world but how can I get the thought out of my head that I NEED some kind of visual or verbal feedback on my photos to keep going?

My reply…

Here is the bottom line from Scape Martinez

“Never give up! Don’t listen to the haters. Don’t try to be an artist unless you can work and live in isolation, without any thanks….bleak, but needed until you get to the much lauded place.”

While good advice, the reality is 99.9% artists will never get to the much lauded place…still we keep working. If you need someone to hold your hand while you do your art, you will probably never amount to much. Art and the rejection associated with art is soul crushing…still we keep working.

With respects to photography…there are 2 billion cell phone cams roaming the earth…still we keep working. But none of this matters. If freezing time is in your blood, being a do-gooder, trying to change the world or making $ does not matter. If your dedicated to your art, you must produce and keep producing, whether you have an outlet or not to make $…or even have any practical use for your output.

We can’t do good work if we are working for ‘likes and thumbs up.’ I mean, are you working for them or for you? If we are not being paid, we need to be working for ourselves to express what WE want to.

I’ve been on forums where likes are given out as one would hand out a million dollars. But just because no one likes my post after 4oo viewings, that doesn’t mean anything to me. I don’t do my work for others, I do it for me.

Art is the way many of us make sense of our world. A wordsmith sifts it all through their brain and writes a book or article, a musician composes a song, a poet pens a poem, an artist sketches a drawing or does a painting, a photog shoots a pix, a sculptor forms a statue, a choreographer creates a dance. We each express what is in us and make sense of our world through our art.

Irrespective of recognition, fame and riches, dedicated photogs all have one thing in common…we  know time. Time is our life blood and as long as we can keep pressing the button and freeze time, we feel the better for it.

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Nice work if you can get it…quoting for commercial photoshoots.

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Article Dedication

In honor of

Walter Gropius & Staatliches Bauhaus

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On the photo forums the perennial question would always pop up on what to charge and how to estimate commercial photography.

I’m not a commercial photog, but I came across a sample quote for a pharmaceutical portrait job involving 12 photos and thought it would be interesting to share with you.

Here is the quote…

Commercial photoshoot estimate

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Commercial photoshoot estimate 2

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Commercial photoshoot estimate 3

Here are the shoot specs:

Shoot Concept: Portraits and photojournalistic manufacturing lifestyle images

Licensing: Unlimited use of all images captured in perpetuity

Location: On location at a pharmaceutical manufacturing facility in the Northwest

Shoot Days: One

Photographer: Northwest-based portrait and lifestyle specialist

Agency: A Small Northwest-based agency

Client: A mid-sized pharmaceutical company

Creative/Licensing: One of our Northwest-based photographers reached out looking for help pulling together an estimate for a library shoot for a local mid-sized pharmaceutical manufacturer. The agency had contacted the photographer requesting a quote for a one day shoot on location at one of their client’s manufacturing facilities. The project called for 12 setups: four environmental shots of the facility/labs, seven photojournalistic lifestyle images of employees “at work” and one lit/staged portrait. The client required unlimited usage of the library of images. We see a lot of projects along these lines, but this project was a bit unusual because the 12 setups were relatively specific. They didn’t seem to offer a lot of opportunity for variations (as opposed to more dynamic scenarios that may allow for a greater degree of variety in the space, subjects and available actions/activities). Shot one, in particular, was much more carefully composed and art directed because it would be used in trade ads, while the other 11 shots would only appear in collateral pieces. After speaking with the photographer about the hefty shot list, we wanted to make sure the client was aware that it was doable, but perhaps a bit ambitious, and that the day may require some prioritization if we were unable to move around as freely and quickly as expected.

Library fees can start around $7500 a day and will often include unlimited or perpetual usage of all images captured. It should be noted, however, that “library” does not necessarily mean unrestricted use (although it did in this case), and may be used to refer just to the volume of imagery. Accordingly, it is important to make the initial assumption that the client is willing to limit the use in some way. Often, clients are willing to limit either the duration of use or quantity of images for a library shoot, so it is best to begin the conversation with that assumption in mind to avoid inadvertently “giving away” more than necessary. Unfortunately, this was not one of those instances, and the client did, in fact, require unlimited, perpetual use of all images captured. Interestingly, the ambitious shot list helped to minimize the value of the library because the photographer would have to move so quickly from one shot to the next that the variety captured would be severely limited. Additionally, five of the 12 shots were very specific and didn’t allow for variations of any substance. Factoring the volume of shots, limited production footprint, type of client, intended use (including the very specific trade ad shot) and otherwise straight forward nature of the shoot, I set the rate at $10,000 for this shoot.

Client Provisions: I was sure to note exactly what the client and agency would provide: locations, staff “talent,” staging area(s), wardrobe, props, releases and necessary technical and safety advisors. The advisor was important to highlight since we wanted a client rep to be on set to ensure the facility and staff were up to snuff from a technical and safety standpoint. There’s nothing worse than wrapping up a shot and finding out that the subject was supposed to have been wearing safety goggles, so we were sure to put that responsibility on client’s shoulders.

*Tech/Scout Day: Due to the challenges associated with accessing this particular facility, the client was unable to allow for a tech/scout day. It’s generally a very important part of a production such as this, but unfortunately, our hands were tied.

Assistants & Tech: I estimated for a first assistant and a digital tech for the shoot. All but one shot would be captured using available light, and mobility within the facility was a concern, so the smaller the crew footprint, the better. The photographer wanted to tether a laptop on a tripod, so we didn’t need a full workstation rental from the tech, hence the lower rate.

Equipment: I estimated one day of gear rental from a local rental house including a DSLR system, a backup body, a handful of fast lenses, a small lighting and grip kit and a laptop to tether.

Styling: I included one stylist to manage basic hair, makeup, and wardrobe needs for the staff and talent. The talent would be wearing a branded uniform which the client provided, so we didn’t need to do any wardrobe shopping.

Shoot Processing for Client Review: This covered the photographer’s time for the initial import, edit, color correction and upload of the entire shoot to an FTP for client review and final image selection.

Selects Processed for Reproduction: I included basic select processing as a lump sum based on 150/image in this case. This protects the fee in the event the client ultimately selects more or less than 12 images.

Casting and Talent: Since the portrait concept called for a relatively tight shoulder up shot of the talent, they agency was comfortable with a digital casting and reviewing recent comp cards to make their selection. The casting fee covered the photographer’s time to reach out to a couple of local talent agents to request current head shots and share them with the agency for review and selection. The talent fees, in this case, were quoted by the local talent agency. Though this is a very reasonable fee for the usage, we’re often able to negotiate slightly lower fees. The fact that this was for a pharmaceutical client put a little bit of a premium on the talent cost.

Mileage, Meals, and Miscellaneous: Finally, we estimated for miles, meals for the production at the on-site cafeteria, and a bit extra to cover any unanticipated miscellaneous costs.

Results: The photographer was awarded the project and luckily, both the client and agency were very easy to work with, and the facilities proved to be as manageable as we had hoped, all of which allowed the photographer to crank out the entire shot list in a normal 10-hour day.

Source of quote and shoot details: Wonderful Machine.

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Women of  the Beat Generation - Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection (3)m

From Girls of the Beat Generation

A forthcoming 6 volume artist’s book series by social documentary photographer Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

https://danielteolijr.wordpress.com/2016/04/21/girls-of-the-beat-generation-artists-book/

A complete list of artist’s books by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

https://danielteolijr.wordpress.com/2016/03/07/artists-books-by-daniel-d-teoli-jr-2/

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De Wallen Graffiti 2014 Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

 

The pussy generation…the bold street photographer does best.

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Article Dedication

in Honor of

David ‘Chim’ Seymour & Walker Evans

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Here is a snip from a Clint Eastwood interview and his take on the Pussy Generation

We live in more of a pussy generation now, where everybody’s become used to saying, “Well, how do we handle it psychologically?” In those days, you just punched the bully back and duked it out. Even if the guy was older and could push you around, at least you were respected for fighting back, and you’d be left alone from then on….I don’t know if I can tell you exactly when the pussy generation started. Maybe when people started asking about the meaning of life.

http://westernstandard.blogs.com/shotgun/2008/12/esquire-interviews-libertarian-clint-eastwood.html

Weegee also sums things up for the timid street photog wannabee when he said,

” There are sheltered souls, who are afraid to mingle with strangers. Some of them go in for table-top photography…a plain case of mental masturbation. To make (street) pictures, you can’t just be polite. You have to go around sticking your nose in other people’s business, same as a midget in a nudist camp.” (quote condensed)

Generally speaking, the bold street photog does best – not the timid one that is scared of their own shadow.

Here is a short video on Weegee…”You can’t be a nice Nellie and do street / news photography.”

Backup link for audio:

https://archive.org/details/WeegeeTellsHow

Even if your balls are the size of shriveled up, freezer burnt, green peas there is hope for the timid photog. What they need to do is to perfect their candid skills so they have little or no fear of being caught.

The young guns coming up are too politically correct to shove their cam in people faces. Society also makes it tough for male photogs to shoot kids. An old guy in his 60’s like me is labeled a sexual predator if they are caught shooting kids on the street.

Well…that is if you are caught!

Many photogs are overthinkers, worried at every possible opportunity. By the time they do all their mental masturbation, the shot is long gone. Shoot first…masturbate at home

There are bold mushroom hunters and there are old mushroom hunters…but there are no old, bold mushroom hunters. That was what an old time shroomer told me that when I told him he was not bold enuf in his foraging. We were discussing edible mushrooms and pushing the edibility envelope.

As a street photog ,boldness is an important part of the success equation. But like anything else, too much of good thing can be harmful. As an example – water and air are life sustaining, but in excess they can kill.

Here is my formula for staying safe on the street and still bringing home the goods with a balance of boldness and street smarts.

https://danielteolijr.wordpress.com/2015/07/27/self-defense-for-the-street-photographer/

Don’t fall into these self-defeating traps…

On the Rangefinder Forum, a camera fondler gave up shooting the red rooms of Amsterdam before he even got in town. In his mind he was convinced he would fail. He quit before he started.

Camera fondlers are always blaming their equipment. Over nearly 50 years of shooting I have used many types of cams. I can tell you if the camera is capable of recording the scene and you don’t get the photo…it is not the cameras problem, the problem is with you.

As the timid photog perfects their candid skills, they will be able to work with impunity right up in people’s faces.

NYE Piercing Darkness Infrared Flash 2015 Daniel D. Teoli Jr. mr

Infrared flash helps, but invisible flash or not, you still have to stick your cam in people’s faces. Once you master your skills you can work between the 2 mediums seamlessly picking the best technique for the subject.

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Selection from Iconoclastic Reporter artist’s book

by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

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